What are some German swear words

15 old-fashioned insults that deserve a comeback

To understand why some swearwords sound old-fashioned or even ridiculous these days, we first have to look at how swearwords come about in the first place. The selection process is relatively simple: whatever is taboo in a culture, whether religion, faeces, sexuality, incest or death, becomes a source of swear words. But as Bob Dylan said: The times, they are changin '. Because taboos change, swear words change too: what was once modern is now an old-fashioned swear word. So today in our comparably secular society, swear words with reference to God are no longer as bad as they used to be.

Another factor that contributes to the obsolescence of curse words is the wear and tear effect. We have long since got used to the sound of some swear words, while our ears cannot yet hide new insults in the same way.

Enough theory? Okay, then make sure young children, your parents, your grandparents, your supervisors, and sensitive readers can't see your screen.

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What are the best old-fashioned swear words?

Disgust

Someone you call that isn't just a gross person. The disgust comes as a whole package, carefully packed and franked.

Storm goat

This expression for an angry, quarrelsome woman simply paints such a beautiful picture in your head ...

Scoundrel

This word was derived from Czech in the 16th century holomek and literally means "beardless". In a figurative sense, it initially stood for a poor boy of noble origin who worked as a servant for a nobleman, but later only turned derogatory to “beggar”, “crook”, “servant”, “servant”. In German the word initially also had the meaning of "beggar", but was then generalized to "bad guy", "rascal" as in Slavonic.

Buffoon

Who today someone the insult Buffoon throws at the head, hardly thinks of the original Hans Wurst, a crude comic figure of the German-language impromptu comedy since the 16th century. The peasant figure appeared in pieces from the fair theater and the traveling stages. Even Luther and Goethe wrote about him - if you use this word, you are in educated company.

Hollow head, wooden head, straw head

Regardless of whether there is straw, wood or nothing in the head, there is definitely not much thought here.

Lacquer monkey

No matter how sleek and ironed a monkey appears ... it remains a monkey after all.

Rascal

Lump is, just as it sounds, a regression of Rags, so a really old, disgusting, shabby piece of cloth. This insult has been documented since the 17th century - a real one Vintage.

monster

This expression comes from the late Middle High Germanschiusel and means “scary picture” or “scarecrow” - it means a repulsively ugly person and / or a disgusting person whose actions make one disgusted.

Slacker

This word for a person who - in a positive or negative way - crosses boundaries with their behavior has been used since the 19th century. The word grew out of the name Slovene (Slavonians), as the Slovenian peddlers were considered particularly cunning businessmen.

Villain

This swear word was adopted from Low German into High German in the 17th century. It is possibly from Low Germancreated ("Eagle Owl") originated because the eagle owl was considered ugly. The term was initially intended for impoverished, decrepit nobles, the use later expanded generally to mean, decrepit or mean people.

Villain

The origin of this swear word is unclear. Maybe it comes from Old High Germanfiur-scurgo, which means "fire fan" and is a term for devil. The word has been used since the 15th century.

Good for nothing or not good

If you throw this swear word at someone's head, you say compactly and elegantly: Nothing can.

Boobies

This term was introduced into the common language by Luther in the 16th century.

Vettel

This swear word for an unkempt, sloppy and elderly woman originated in the 15th century from late Middle High German vetel, a term used in student circles with the meaning "dissolute woman". Vetel again comes from the Latinvetus and means "old".

Changeling

According to earlier popular belief, a changeling is an ugly, misshapen child or illegitimate child who has been foisted by evil spirits or dwarfs.